5 reasons to live in the colonial zone of Santo Domingo (April 2021 UPDATE)

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Reason 4 to live in the Colonial Zone: Quite a safe place to live


Safety concerns are always present before moving to a new place. Especially in bigger Latin American cities.

I already have had plenty of years living abroad and in Latin American capitals. Probably everyone who lived before abroad comprehends what I want to say now. Even if you are a risky type of person, you probably learn how to deal with these safety concerns and behave accordingly and longsighted. As a stranger in a strange culture, you either need powerful and knowledgeable friends or be clever and careful enough to avoid all sorts of occurring problems. If you are a first-timer, you learn by doing (it wrong), because of your missing experience.

Of course, every situation, temperament, or scenario is individual. But crimes can happen literally everywhere. I always felt safe in the Colonial Zone and nothing ever happened to me. In comparison to other areas of Santo Domingo, the Colonial Zone is better monitored and equipped with more police surveillance.



That doesn’t mean on the other hand, that there is a zero crime statistic in the Colonial Zone. Don’t rely completely on these underpaid law enforcement forces. They don’t have the same education, quality, and motivation you are accustomed to from your mother country. At least their sheer number shrieks of gangsters and limits crimes.

But it’s your responsibility to take care of yourself and evade attention and attraction to criminals. Don’t show off too much jewelry, don’t brag too much, and never bring all of your belongings with you. Cash and phone are more than enough – Leave all the other stuff at home, if you don’t need it.


Some Dominicans have their own understanding of how to lock their car.

That’s a very conscious plan to both be and feel safe. But the Colonial isn’t more dangerous than other areas of the city. Where there are tourists, it’s usually safer than where there aren’t tourists.


Next page: Greater tolerance for minorities in the Colonial Zone

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